Vapage Ecigarettes

The e-cigarette was invented by a Chinese pharmacist in 2003 and initially promoted as a medical device to assist long-time smokers quit or reduce their tobacco habit. The device simulates the experience of smoking without the ill effects associated with tobacco smoking.

Similar to humidifiers or nebulizers, e-cigarettes have plastic and metal components. The second contains the heating element that vaporizes the e-liquid so it can be inhaled.

In most designs, the atomizer is replaceable since it uses filaments that burn out after prolonged use. This part runs on rechargeable Li-ion or replaceable alkaline battery types.

The e-liquid, or e-juice, is the concentrate that creates the vapor when placed on the atomizer. Often sold separately in cartridges or in canisters that allow for easy refilling, most solutions contain nicotine. The formulation varies from zero to low and mid-range, and to high and extra-high doses.

The e-liquid is available in different flavors. The majority of solutions imitate the smoky and toasted taste of tobacco, while some mimic the mentholated tastes.

To appeal to the younger crowd, some suppliers offer flavor variants including the more popular coffee, chocolate, soda, and vanilla. Apple, orange, lemon, strawberry, and melon are among the fruity tastes that can be bought on specialty stands.  The flavor of the nicotine can be added to the liquid solution by dissolving it to propylene glycol, vegetable glycerin, or polyethylene glycol 400. The three are common food additives used in many recipes and pharmaceutical formula, and are well tolerated by the human body.

Various food and pharmaceutical agencies around the world are still divided on how the body can tolerate the chemicals that e-cigarettes may contain. In fact they are not even sure on whether they can classify the product as a cigarette or a medical device. For instance, the United States has recently announced that it will classify and regulate e-cigarettes as a common tobacco product but has not issued a ban.  On the other hand, New Zealand has asserted that the device is safer than smoking tobacco.

The World Health Organization does not consider electronic cigarette to be a legitimate therapy for quitting the smoking habit but does not discount the possibility that it could be a useful cessation aid.

On the consumer side, former chain smokers have given their testimonies regarding the effectivity of the device. Many confirm that the device can provide the nicotine buzz without the ill-effects of tobacco.  The behavioral aspects of smoking are also addressed. Compared to nicotine patches, smokers can hold and puff, and exhale the vapor that looks like smoke.

Most models are even packaged and designed to look like popular Philip Morris and Lucky Strike brands. Others come in cigar shapes and have the crests of popular tabacaleras in Europe and South America.

What is certainly known about e-cigarette is that their quality continues to improve and that it’s already helping a lot of long-time smokers. If you plan to quit the habit, you can check out for yourself what’s been said about the device or turn on one and try a few puffs.